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Educator Spotlight: Sara Ahmed, Teaching The Arrival

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  Educator Spotlight: Teaching the Arrival Welcome…

PBS’s Chinese Exclusion Act (chapter 1)

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Use this short excerpt from PBS's Chinese Exclusion as part of…
This black and white image of Immigrants arriving at Ellis Island can be used in a lesson plan on the history of immigration to the United States.

Immigrant Students Are Internalizing Stereotypes. Educators Can Help

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Did you see our commentary Immigrant Students Are Internalizing…
Moving Stories

A lesson in civility: The negativity immigrant students hear

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A survey of immigrant children in the U.S. revealed just how…

Classroom Resource: Facundo the Great

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Discussions about names can provide opportunities to build community,…

Educator Spotlight: Carola Suárez Orozco

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Culturally Responsive Teaching with Carola Suárez Orozco The…

Names, Identity, and Immigration

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Names play an important role in our identities. The selection…
Children of Immigration 

Children of Immigration

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Carola Suárez-Orozco and Marcelo Suárez-Orozco
Stories of Identity: Religion, Migration, and Belonging in a Changing World,

Stories of Identity: Religion, Migration, and Belonging in a Changing World

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Adam Strom (Author/Editor) Carola Suárez-Orozco (Afterward) for Facing History and Ourselves
SELECTED ARTICLES, BOOKS, AND RESOURCES FROM OUR TEAM Children of Immigration, Carola Suárez-Orozco and Marcelo Suárez-Orozco Now in the midst of the largest wave of immigration in history, America, mythical land of immigrants, is once again contemplating a future in which new arrivals will play a crucial role in reworking the fabric of the nation. At the center of this prospect are the children of immigrants, who make up one fifth of America’s youth. This book, written by the codirectors of the largest ongoing longitudinal study of immigrant children and their families, offers a clear, broad, interdisciplinary view of who these children are and what their future might hold. For immigrant children, the authors write, it is the best of times and the worst. These children are more likely than any previous generation of immigrants to end up in Ivy League universities–or unschooled, on parole, or in prison. Most arrive as motivated students, respectful of authority and quick to learn English. Yet, at the same time, many face huge obstacles to success, such as poverty, prejudice, the trauma of immigration itself, and exposure to the materialistic, hedonistic world of their native-born peers. The authors vividly describe how forces within and outside the family shape these children’s developing sense of identity and their ambivalent relationship with their adopted country. Their book demonstrates how “Americanization,” long an immigrant ideal, has, in a nation so diverse and full of contradictions, become ever harder to define, let alone achieve. Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World

Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World: The Ross School Model and Education for the Global Era

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Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco (Editor), Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj (Editor)
Global Migration, Diversity, and Civic Education: Improving Policy and Practice

Global Migration, Diversity, and Civic Education: Improving Policy and Practice

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James A. Banks (Author), Marcelo Suárez-Orozco (Author), Miriam Ben-Peretz (Author)
Globalization: Culture and Education in the New Millennium

Globalization: Culture and Education in the New Millennium

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Marcelo Suarez-Orozco (Editor), Desiree B. Qin-Hilliard (Editor)

Why Teach about Migration?

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The story of migration is the story of humankind. The genetic and paleontological record of human migration is at least 70,000 years old. Researchers know that all of us can trace our ancestry to Southern Africa, while some homo sapiens migrated across Africa and stayed, others ventured out to the Asia, Australia, Europe, and eventually to the Americas. This is our shared experience.
Learning in a New Land: Immigrant Students in American Society, Carola Suárez-Orozco (Author), Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco (Author), Irina Todorova (Author) One child in five in America is the child of immigrants, and their numbers increase each year. Very few will return to the country they barely remember. Who are they, and what America do they know? Based on an extraordinary interdisciplinary study that followed 400 newly arrived children from the Caribbean, China, Central America, and Mexico for five years, this book provides a compelling account of the lives, dreams, and frustrations of these youngest immigrants. Richly told portraits of high and low achievers are packed with unexpected ironies. When they arrive, most children are full of optimism and a respect for education. But poor neighborhoods and dull–often dangerous–schools can corrode hopes. The vast majority learn English–but it is the English of video games and the neighborhood, not that of standardized tests. For some of these children, those heading off to college, America promises to be a land of dreams. These lucky ones have often benefited from caring mentors, supportive teachers, or savvy parents. For others, the first five years are marked by disappointments, frustrations, and disenchantment. How can we explain their varied academic journeys? The children of immigrants, here to stay, are the future–and how they adapt will determine the nature of America in the twenty-first century

Book: Learning in a New Land: Immigrant Students in American Society

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Carola Suárez-Orozco (Author), Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco (Author), Irina Todorova (Author)

Emma Lazarus’s “The New Colossus” and The Statue of Liberty

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Introduction: Lessons and resources for teaching about Emma Lazarus,…

Re-imagining Approaches to Immigration in Schools

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  In the United States, immigrants and their children…